Family violence

Violence between family members is subject to legal intervention in the same way as violence between strangers.

Family violence is recognised to take many forms, including not only physical injury, but also emotional and psychological harm, social isolation and financial control.

If family violence comes to the attention of police, they may issue an intervention order (see Intervention orders) or lay criminal charges agaainst the perpetrator (see Criminal charges).

Even though not all forms of family violence carry a criminal sanction and penalty, all forms are often relevant to courts, for example, all forms are relevant when a court is making intervention orders or parenting orders.

Vicitms of family violence in the past have been stigmatised and the prevailing attitude of keeping the problem behind closed doors as a ‘private’ family matter only furthered vicitimisation and increased the vulnerability of victims. Legislation now emphasises family violence as a social problem affecting all members of society and attracting the full sanctions of criminal justice intervention. However, it should be noted that legal remedies can sometimes be of limited use in a crisis. It is more often the practical steps and planning a person can take which will be of much greater significance for their safety than reliance on legal remedies alone.

Practical measures  :  Last Revised: Thu May 29th 2014
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